Poetry – Internal Ramblings of Automatic Writing-Scribing Process

What Can I Say?

Gender bender, radical right.
Fortnight coming, out of sight!
Tumultuous times, mornings anew.
Filled with rapture, yet sensing doom!
Where am I now? Where will I be?
No recognition of truth, What do I see?
Askance is my vision, narrowing now!
To what is expected, why and how?
Wandering out, reigning in
Flamboyant and powerful, meek and dim!
Who is in charge? I do not know?
Amid the corruption, a pure driven flow.
Changing arranging, often mid flight.
Brilliant ideas, created at night.
Lost in first shadows,of the upcoming day
When the practical me, has nothing to say.

Possibilities

Surrounded by time and space
I do embrace what is to come
Yesterday is gone
Today is waning
Tomorrow is waiting
An empty canvas
Brush in hand
I create according to plan
A remembered vision
A subconscious thrust
Nudging me forward
In God I trust
The table is set
The guests arrive
Feeling their presence
I begin to scribe
Inwardly focussed
Outwardly bound
Pure potential I’ve found

Spirit Lies

Spirit lies beneath the wings of floating
thoughts engaged in turbulent travel.
Unresolved issues, spewing forth in
determined effort to engage oneself in
truth. Now engaged, it readies itself to
travel forth to meet the doom of old
beliefs. Rendering what once was to a new
understanding of self. Imposed analogy of
what is and what was and what is yet to be,
melding in the internal-eternal swirl of
who I once was and yet will always be.
Devoid of truth, I shall not know what is
perception and what is so. All is lost, yet
more is gained. Internal struggles subside
as I truly allow my center to guide. The
truth of me without the lie: no longer hidden
and buried inside. My spirit runs free
united in the oneness of me.

Unmatched

Forget tomorrow, remember today
Clashing moments, leading us astray
Engaged in fancies, oft not fulfilled
Lumbering forward, at an awkward tilt
Unmatched visions, separate missions
Discordant rhythms, lumber along
Wandering here, wondering why
Disengaged focus distractions abound
Futile attempts, not on firm ground
What? We ask, without reply
When? We question as time goes by
Who? We muster is in charge
Where? We search deep in side
Why? oh why does it seem so hard
To create symmetry as we move through time
Fluidity of movement on a single path
Where questions are answered based on trust
Being inwardly guided is a must

The Mayan Rabbit Scribe

I first learned about the Mayan Rabbit Scribe back in 2000 when my husband and I traveled to Guatemala to explore the ruins at Tikal. I had been to several various sites in the past, including Chichen-Itza, Tulum and Coba because I’ve been fascinated with the Mayan culture ever since I was a child. Perhaps I even manifested these Mayan temple journeys as a teenager while coloring in the drawings of a Mayan-Incan-Aztec coloring book I bought at a second-hand store.

The amount of information that you can find about the Mayan culture online or in your local library is nothing compared with the facts and lore you hear from the tour guides onsite.

While visiting Tikal, I learned that the Mayans had kept journals of their history and culture, called “codices” most of which were destroyed by order of a Spanish padre, Father Diego de Landa, in a great bonfire in a central Yucatan town called Mani. The padre believed that the books were the work of the devil and were preventing the Mayans from becoming truly civilized. By his order, anyone caught with a codex was summarily tortured and or killed. Only four codices (some of them partial) have survived.

For generations, as the stelas and other stone carvings of the Mayans disintegrated, no one could understand what the carvings meant, and an entire culture was about to be submerged by the tides of history until a few archaeologists figured out the mysteries of the glyphs.

I met a couple of archaeologists who had come to Tikal to photograph artifacts and carvings. They had dedicated their lives to understanding the Mayan way of life. One, by the name of Eleanor “Bunny” Coates, had been coming to Mayan sites for many years. She told me about the Rabbit Scribe.

I glommed right onto that entity, as I’m a writer myself, and I know what it is like to be the family documentarian. I know how important the writer is – although unsung – in any movie or video production you will ever happen to see. Without the writer, nothing gets written down! Without the writer, the memory of an event or series of events loses detail and soon fades into obscurity

The rabbit scribe first appears as part of a scene on a painted Classic Maya vase (circa 300 to 900 AD), that may have been used to serve a chocolate beverage. Scribes conducted the important business of recording important events for royalty using a phonetically-based hieroglyphic script. These rabbit scribes appeared on murals and vases usually writing on a fan-folding book, or “codex,” that was covered with jaguar-skin. Writing was very important to the Maya and they recorded important events on everything – walls, stairs, sculptures, ceramics, plates and stone.

Fortunately, the plan of Padre Diego de Landa to completely destroy the written history of the Classic Mayan culture, has been foiled by diligent archaeologists who have, over last several decades, been able to decipher many of the Mayan glyphs. Dr. David Stuart of the University of Texas at Austin has been a prominent force in shining a light on the meaning and impact of Mayan culture, and continues to make inroads with his fascinating work.

Jerome As Doctor of the Catholic Church

Establishment of the Catholic Church

Following the establishment of the Catholic Church by Roman Emperor Constantine it went through years of destabilization. It was almost on the brink of collapse when Jerome was appointed by Damasus, the then Bishop of Rome, to save it. As an educated and well-traveled scribe Jerome had also lived in the East for many years. He had spent time in Bethlehem where he witnessed atrocities against women that he thought justified, as noted in his diary.

Jerome’s Version of the Facts

Jerome’s letters and diaries are available in public libraries and are a wealth of information into the beginning of the church, the struggles to overcome the disparity between various groups and the opposition to many of its claims and especially its new found prophet. The religion was founded at the Council of Nicaea where the differences between the delegates really showed up. They were all of sun-worshiping religions born of the Babylonian Islam, as was Constantine and his bishops.

Imperial Roman Religion

The imperial Roman Religion was copied from that of the Egyptian religion and temples to Isis were prominent in Rome at the time. Constantine believed he was the son of Apollo, an image of the sun god in human form. He was considered a living god and was obviously jealous of any other god that could take his power away. The Catholic religion was his way of counteracting this threat.

Buried Roots

Over the years the church he established has altered many things and written much to bury the roots of the faith in myths from sun worship. Jerome, however, has done us a favor by leaving behind records of what he did and how he accomplished them.

Delegates to the Council of Nicaea

The Council delegates, from various reports, went back to their churches unable to practice anything of the new religion as they had no format. That meant they carried on before with new orders from Constantine that everyone much worship the image he created. He gave the church leaders’ power over life and death to ensure this happened. That power was carried through until the Middle Ages and later.

Constantine’s New Parliament

What he had done was to establish a parliament answerable to him as king that could rule in all the provinces in his name and control the masses through what they called spirituality. The weapons to do this were heaven and hell. If one obeyed then they could go to the former but rebels would go to the latter.

Jerome’s Commission

With only that to go on Jerome now had to work out how to save the Church while giving it structure, laws, a format to work to and even tradition. He did that by adopting the garments, order of service, festivals and calendar from the Imperial Roman Religion. This is in his letters uncovered by Fray Jose of Spain who was commissioned by Phillip II to research Jerome’s history. He had access to Vatican archives to complete the task. While he was doing this in the 16th CAD he was perplexed as to how Jerome could have translated the Septuagint from Hebrew as he had no knowledge of that language. In fact he concluded that the translation, which became the Old Testament, was translated from Greek.

Jerome’s Admissions

Jerome states how he altered parts of it to comply with the New Testament and of that document he states that he took all the writings from around the empire and decided which was “most true”. He also states how he wrote introductions to chapters in both books and the Book of Matthew, which is based on the birth and life of Krishna, details church laws that were not known beforehand.

Differences in the Four Gospels

Differences between the four gospels are stark. Matthew and Luke are the only 2 that recognise the birth of Christ. Matthew claims he was born in a house and fled to Egypt to avoid the evil king Herod. Luke states he was born in a manger and was taken to the temple at 8 days of age and presented as normal. He then lived in Nazareth as a carpenter’s son. Both these books are written by scholars and it is impossible that those who were not highly educated scribes could have written them.

Vulgate was First Bible

Jerome then published the completed bible as the Vulgate at the end of the 4th CAD. While the Catholic Church recognizes this other Christian denominations oppose it because they do not want to believe that their faith is Catholic. The facts are that there was no Christian movement before Constantine invented it along with its image of Christ, as predicted in Revelation 13:13-18.